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What The Bible DOESN’T Say

One of the best ways to read Scripture is to ask yourself, “What is this passage saying by what it DOESN’T say?”

For example, take a look at John 10:10, where Jesus says, “I have come that you might have life and have it abundantly.”  Think of all the things that Jesus doesn’t say here:

“I have come that you might have life and have an average one.”

“I have come that you might have life and have a boring one.”

“I have come that you might have life and merely endure it.”

None of that.  Jesus declares that in him we can have lives full of meaning, purpose, and joy.

Or consider I Timothy 2:3-4, a verse my Wesleyan bias keeps getting drawn to:  “This is good and pleases God our Savior who wants all men to be saved and come to a knowledge of the truth.”  Think of what Paul doesn’t say here:

“This is good and pleases God our Savior who wants the elect to be saved and come to a knowledge of the truth.”

“This is good and pleases God our Savior who wants a few to be saved and come to a knowledge of the truth.”

“This is good and pleases God our Savior who wants people just like you to be saved and come to a knowledge of the truth.”

None of that.  Paul reminds Timothy and us that God’s heart beats with a great longing for all people — and “all” means “all” —  to enter into a living relationship with Jesus Christ.

Or even I John 5:13:  “I write these things to you who believe in the name of the Son of God so that you may know you have eternal life.”  

John doesn’t say, “I write these things to you who believe in the name of the Son of God so that you may hope you have eternal life.”

Or “I write these things to you who believe in the name of the Son of God so that you may work for eternal life.”  

Or “I write these things to you who believe in the name of the Son of God so that you may wish you have eternal life.”  

None of that.  Instead, John gives us a blessed assurance rooted not in our goodness but in Jesus’ completed work on the cross and in the resurrection.

Reflecting on what the bible doesn’t say gives you a greater appreciation for what it does say.

Today:  read through Colossians 1 and as you read what it says, jot down some of what it’s not saying.  I believe you’ll be grateful for the experience and reflection.

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